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TDA Recommends: The Best of Young Adult LGBTQ+ Books


Fatin Hamama


As much as we love it to death, there are so many more mesmerising LGBTQ+ novels out there that aren’t Call Me By Your Name, and here are a bunch of them that you might want to binge read over this nightmare of a lockdown.

 

I’ll Give You The Sun by Jandy Nelson

Noah twists the universe in colours unseen in his mind and births it on papers in his hands. One day, he falls in love with a boy who collects meteorites in a suitcase and shows him his own universe through telescopes. Jude, Noah’s twin sister, makes sand sculptures of women woven in wind and grace only to let the sea wash it away moments later. One day, she falls in love with the sketch of a guy made by Noah during his escapades of sneak peeking through the back window of an art class.

But turns of fate and 3 years later, everything that ever shaped who they are have changed, and so have they. A phenomenal tribute to family, art, fate, love, and life, this book is bound to keep readers enchanted till the end.

 

Like A Love Story by Abdi Nazemian 

This novel follows Reza, terrified of acknowledging his own sexuality; Art, who wears his own like a laurel, and Judy, who uses music and fashion as coping mechanisms for life and all its tides — through their voyage of friendship, love, heartbreaks, and identity crises.

From dealing with crucial issues related to the LGBT+ community to beautifully depicting each and every aspect of the activism and frenzy of protests that ripped through America in the wake of the mass homophobia that emerged during the outbreak of AIDS in the 80s, this book really is an alarming reminder of the people and things that are worth living this life for. Also, anyone obsessed with 80s American pop culture will really enjoy this title as it’s filled to the brim with such references!

 

The Love And Lies of Rukhsana Ali by Sabina Khan

Hailing from a conservative Bangladeshi family living in America, Rukhsana has never considered coming out to her parents or introducing them to her girlfriend. One day, her mother stumbles upon an intimate moment between them and all the effort she has put into keeping her two lives separate comes undone. Rukhsana is taken to Bangladesh to live with her maternal family, but when the purpose of the abrupt visit is revealed, it seems like her life is about to go down an abyss, out of her control and stripped of her true self.

Seldom do we see books featuring the South Asian LGBT+ community and its struggles in a still-developing society where superstitions and false religious beliefs claim a huge part of people’s lives. However, this book deals with it in an extremely realistic way, while also depicting remarkable female friendships.

 

The Gentleman’s Guide To Vice and Virtue byMackenzi Lee

18-year-old Henry Montague is a British aristocrat who is despised by his father for “mucking around with boys” instead of establishing himself as the worthy heir of his estates and wealth. In need of some distance from his life, Henry embarks on a grand tour of Europe with his childhood best friend and crush, Percy Newton, and his sister. But when he makes a rash and foolish decision, their trip turns into an equal part subject to manhunt and a brilliant adventure.

Extremely witty and humorous, this book excellently portrays this bisexual British lord’s journey through the ups and downs of love, friendships, and self acknowledgement.

 

I Wish You All The Best by Mason Deaver

Forced to move in with their sister and her husband after being thrown out of their house for coming out as nonbinary to their parents, Ben De Backer is trying to deal with a new school while struggling with an anxiety disorder sprouted from their parents’ derision regarding who they are.

But then they meet charismatic and sardonic Nathan, which starts off as a disastrous series of events and soon turns into something life-changing. Written by a queer author themselves, it’s an eye-opening and heart-touching novel that deserves recognition.

 


All of Hamama’s problems smell like দারুচিনি cause she’s দ্বীপ into them 24/7.

One Comment

  1. Pretty cool. Heard some of them before, never knew the plot or anything close to the details given here. Glad to have read it.

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